Welcome to the Lest We Forget submission site

Here you can share your items, stories or memories related to the First World War or the people and places that were involved or affected. You can also see the stories and objects that have been shared by others. The site is used by organisers who have run a Digital Collection Day as part of the Lest We Forget project, but anyone from anywhere around the world is welcome to upload material that they have and want to share.

What are we looking for?

We welcome anything that originates from the First World War that you are willing to share with the rest of the world online as part of a major collection - things your family have kept or you have collected (letters, photos, diaries, memoirs, medals, souvenirs, uniforms, art, etc), information about anyone who lived through the war or was affected by it (serving personnel, adults and children on the home front, or key events during the war or directly related to it).

Above all we are interested in the story behind the items - who/where/what/when - or even just stories themselves passed down through your family that you'd like to record. We can take files in any format (e.g. photos of items, word documents, pdfs, and even audio or video files if you have recorded interviews).

For more information on the project as a whole visit our project web site or email us at ww1collections@it.ox.ac.uk. We are especially looking for volunteers who wish to run their own local Digital Collection Day. We can provide material and information to support you.

What will happen to the information I send you?

All the material will be stored securely on Oxford University servers and preserved. The stories and photographs you send us will be displayed on our web site for anyone world-wide to view and reuse for educational purposes only (what is known as a Creative Commons licence CC-BY-NC) but not for commercial reuse. We will also display your name unless you choose to be anonymous but we will never display your contact details. All your personal data will be held securely. We also will share the objects with some other major WW1 projects to add to their collections also thus maximising their use and ensuring further preservation copies. 

From the collection

  • War medals and pin

    These medals and pin belonged to my grandfather, George Honey, a volunteer soldier with the Royal Berkshire Regiment. He was invalided in 1917 (gassed) and died in 1932.
  • Austrain war medals

    These Austrian army medals belonged to my wife's maternal grandfather. One is gilded in gold and the other is bronze.
  • Sunningwell Parish Records, war years

    Pages from the Sunningwell parish records minute book, used for meetings of the council. The record rarely includes notes related to the war. It does, however, reference housing allotment at the end of the war, as well as war memorials. The village lost 18 of the 60 men who served.
  • German War Goblet

    This Iron goblet, dated 1914-1916, was once bought for a war fund. The text on it reads: 'The iron goblet, the full one, dedicated to the iron heroes in the iron age'. The other inscription reads: 'I trusted in my people and the justice of our cause'. This goblet was given me to (Robert Evans) as a student while I was studying in Prague. I had used it to hold flowers.
  • Great War mementos of the Lloyd family

    The images here are of artefacts found when clearing the Lloyd family house in Wantage. Lorenzo Lloyd moved to Wantage from Wiltshire in 1895 and established an engineering business there which was located in Portway. The former farmhouse and adjacent barn which housed the workshop were demolished in the late 1970's but the workshop has since been recreated in the Wantage and Downland Museum.
  • Pocket Bible

    The pocket bible belonging to Private Robert Stewart, my great-uncle. He served in the King's Own Scottish Borders and was killed in December 1916. He was buried near the causality clearing station. As my grandmother could not afford to travel to his grave in France, I was the first family member to visit. Though I didn't know him, it was a very emotional experience. It was a small cemetery, I placed a small cross on his grave. When my grandmother died, the letters and objects relating to his service and death were passed to her grandson, my son
  • Memorial Photograph

    A small framed memorial photograph of Private Robert Stewart, my great-uncle. He served in the King's Own Scottish Borders and was killed in December 1916. He was buried near the causality clearing station. As my grandmother could not afford to travel to his grave in France, I was the first family member to visit. Though I didn't know him, it was a very emotional experience. It was a small cemetery, I placed a small cross on his grave. When my grandmother died, the letters and objects relating to his service and death were passed to her grandson, my son
  • Official notice of death (letter)

    The official notice of death of Private Robert Stewart, my great-uncle. He served in the King's Own Scottish Borders and was killed in 1916. He was buried near the causality clearing station. As my grandmother could not afford to travel to his grave in France, I was the first family member to visit. Though I didn't know him, it was a very emotional experience. It was a small cemetery, I placed a small cross on his grave. When my grandmother died, the letters and objects relating to his service and death were passed to her grandson, my son
  • Princess Mary gift box with letters, photo, medals, and death notice

    This gift box (given to soldiers by Princess Mary) belonged to my great uncle, Robert Stewart. He served in the King's Own Scottish Borders and was killed in 1916. He was buried near the causality clearing station. The box once sat in my grandmother's house. I remember her taking it out as a child. My mother could not remember him, but she did recall her mother taking the box out from time to time; she would be told to wash her hands before she was aloud to touch it - so that it would be kept safe. The box contains a small pencil, a pocket bible, a medal, a framed memorial photograph of my great uncle, along with 2 official letters on his death. As my grandmother could not afford to visit his grave in France, I was the first family member to visit. Though I didn't know him, it was a very emotional experience. It was a small cemetery, I placed a small cross on his grave. When my grandmother died, the box and its contents were passed to her grandson, my son.
  • Postcard/Photograph

    Postcard-Photograph of my grandparents, James (in uniform), and Rose Sellwood. My grandfather served with the Oxford Bucks. He survived the war, along with his 6 brothers who also served - a rare story.
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